Selma Alabama Events

SELMA, Alabama - Republican John Lewis, who was attacked with tear gas and police truncheons in Selma, Alabama, on Bloody Sunday in 1965, will make an unexpected but inspiring appearance Sunday to lead protesters across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Thousands of people will take to the streets from the Selma Acropolis to mark the 50th anniversary of the historic march of the civil rights movement from the Alabama State Capitol to the state Capitol.

In 1965, civil rights activists marching from Selma to Montgomery were beaten by Alabama state troopers as they crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge. On Bloody Sunday, April 4, 1963, civil rights activists marching from Selma to the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama, were beaten with tear gas and police truncheons.

Amelia Boynton lies on the ground as she is beaten and gassed by state troopers in Selma, Alabama, on Bloody Sunday. People help Amelia Boyton after she was beaten and kicked by a state trooper during a march to the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama, on Sunday, April 4, 1963. Several people are supporting several people who stood by Amelia Boynton as she was beaten and gassed by Alabama State Police at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. A man helps Amelia Boynton as he is beaten and gassed by state soldiers during Bloody Sunday in Selma, Alabama, on Saturday, October 1, 1965.

Demonstrators reach the Edmund Pettus Bridge during a march to the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama, on Sunday, April 4, 1963. A marcher grabs Amelia Boynton as she is beaten and gassed by state soldiers during Bloody Sunday in Selma.

Protesters, journalists and police officers gather for a march to the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama, on Sunday, April 4, 1963. Civil rights marchers line the Edmund Pettus Bridge during the Bloody Sunday March in Selma, Alabama, on Saturday, March 18, 1965.

Civil rights marchers leave Brown Chapel AME Church and march home during Bloody Sunday March in Selma, Alabama, on Saturday, March 18, 1965. Civil rights marchers march from the Edmund Pettus Bridge to the home of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., on Sunday, April 4, 1963.

Civil rights marchers march from the Edmund Pettus Bridge to the home of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma, Alabama, on Sunday, April 4, 1963.

Protesters approach the Capitol in downtown Montgomery, Alabama, at the end of the Selma-Montgomery march. The Capitol was led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders in 1963 as the conclusion of the "Selma to Montgomery" march.

Selma on the final leg of the march, a Dallas County farce riding high awaits Bloody Sunday at the intersection of Selma Boulevard and Interstate 30 in Selma, Alabama.

SNCC member Jim Bevel suggested the ride should take place in Selma, Alabama, where unsuccessful SNCC voter registration has been taking place for months.

The two invited Martin Luther King Jr. to Selma to campaign for voting rights, and it has been their home ever since. The Selma March (also called the Selma Montgomery March) took place from March 21 to 25, 1965. This was the first of three protest marches held in Montgomery, Alabama, in support of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the civil rights movement in Alabama. All three were part of a larger movement seeking voting rights for blacks in Selma, Alabama.

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) organized a mass march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965, to protest the arrest of Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights activists. About six hundred people began their march on Sunday, March 7, 1965, on what is known in history as Bloody Sunday. This was the first of three marches in support of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Alabama civil rights movement, which took place March 5-21. The first protest march for voting rights for black Americans in the US took place on April 4, 1964 in Selmas, Alabama, and on March 8, 1963 in Montgomery, Alabama, when 600 people began a 54-mile walk to the Alabama State Capitol, a journey meant to show their support for the exercise of their constitutional right to vote.

On March 7, 1965, demonstrators who were marching from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, were beaten and gassed by Alabama state troopers. Thousands of people marched outside the Alabama State Capitol to protest the disenfranchisement of African Americans who supported the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the civil rights movement in the United States. On March 8, 1963, the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr. "s arrest, thousands of people marched in Selma, Alabama, and from March 5-21, 1964, in Montgomery and other cities across the state to protest the Voter ID Act and voting rights for black Americans. But on April 4, 1962, at the same time as the first protest march for voting rights, an eligible voter who was trying to march from Selma, Montgomery's capital, was gassed, gassed, and torn to pieces by an Alabama state trooper.

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More About Selma